30% OFF SIGNATURE SNAP POTS | USE CODE 'SNAP30'

Understanding Scent Notes

Written by Scott Fellows

• 

Posted on April 29 2021

     All fragrances are made up of 3 notes. Top notes, middles notes and base notes. Each aroma has a different balance of these notes which in turn affect the fragrance and how long it last

     Overall, there is no simple rule when using wax melts, you can't just say each melt will last a set amount of time and you can't say they will all smell just as much as each other since the notes they are made up of differ from scent to scent. In this article we give a brief guide to scent notes, how they affect your melts and how you perceive them

     TOP NOTES - otherwise known as head notes, top notes sit on top of the fragrance and are the first to be smelt. They are often light aromas such as citrus fruits and light florals. They are the first to be evaporated when melted in a wax melts since they are the smallest molecules. This is why those floral/citrusy notes in your favourite perfume fade away after a short while and the fragrance begins to smell different.

     MIDDLE NOTES - often referred to as heart notes, they are there to follow up from the top notes and give a pleasant more rounded aroma from the base. Middle notes last longer than top notes. Florals are often considered middle notes such as lavender, rose and geranium

     BASE NOTES - the longest lasting of all the notes, the base notes work in unison to give the main theme of the aroma. They finish off the fragrance by giving strength to the above notes. With larger molecules base notes don't usually come through until a little later in the melt. Common base notes are Vanilla bean, Tonka Bean, deep woods, Amber and Musks.

     Now that you understand the behaviour of these notes, its easier to acknowledge how they are affecting your melt and why some scents last longer than others and why some smell slightly different after the first melt. Who'd have known you'd need a chemistry degree when picking wax melts. We do offer a whole range of sample pop shots so you can discover the fragrances that you prefer. You can also apply this guide to all aspects of fragrance, even when testing new perfumes and hopefully it helps you understand fragrance a little more

Comments

0 Comments

Leave a Comment